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Politicians look ahead to ’14 session

January 7, 2014

MARSHALL — Subzero temperatures didn’t dissuade local residents and Minnesota legislators from meeting up Monday....

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(6)

SELyonCo

Jan-07-14 9:41 AM

Where in the world does Dahm's get the idea that bullying legislation should only apply to schools?? The state needs strong anti-bullying legislation that clearly defines and criminalized bullying, in-person or cyber. The state currently has a "C" grade from it's week anti-bullying law. Let's look to some states like Delaware, Florida, and Kentucky that receive top marks for their anti-bullying legislation. BullyPolice dot Org is a resource Dahm's and Swedzinski should become familiar with.

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AModerate

Jan-07-14 2:46 PM

Nobody is "pro-bullying". My concern is that in trying to legislate common sense, politicians are creating more problems than they are fixing. In trying to dictate how administrators do their job, policies remove their ability to manage each case. Do we need to do better - yes. Does more paperwork help - I don't think so.

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commonman

Jan-07-14 7:58 PM

Swede's response to the anti-bullying bill is to broaden gun rights. Typical radical conservative thinking: if everybody has a gun, people will be less likely to use them. Not for the mentally ill or really ticked off...... And then how does allowing heavier trucks to ruin our roads save the public money? This only saves big businesses money and costs tax payers in the long run for road repair. Main Street in Marshall anybody?

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hartman75

Jan-08-14 12:59 PM

"And then how does allowing heavier trucks to ruin our roads save the public money?"

Transportation costs can represent a relatively large share of a businesses overhead expense. Smaller, lighter loads require more trips. That additional cost is passed on the consumer whether you're a retailer reselling a product or providing material for public work projects. The question is: would allowing heavier loads actually lead to greater road maintenance costs as compared to existing costs?

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rangeral

Jan-09-14 1:46 PM

hartman - an economic genius you are not.

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hartman75

Jan-10-14 11:09 AM

rangeral, your comment is meaningless unless you're able to provide evidence that supports your opinion.

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