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Mixing it up

SMSU employee returns to the art scene with a solo show at the Whipple Gallery

May 21, 2011
By Cindy Votruba , Marshall Independent

MARSHALL - The last time Glen Bruns of Marshall had an art show of his works was when he was a senior in college in the mid-1970s.

Bruns' art is featured in the current exhibit through June 24 at the William Whipple Gallery at Southwest Minnesota State University.

Bruns majored in graphic arts at the vo-tech college in Mankato before he and his wife came to Southwest in 1973. Bruns graduated from there with a degree in studio arts. Painting and drawing were his main mediums.

Article Photos

Photo by Cindy Votruba
Pictured is one of Glen Bruns’ mixed media pieces on display at the William Whipple Gallery at Southwest Minnesota State University.

After he graduated, Bruns and his wife started a family and raised six children. So art was put on hold for many years. He works as an offset press operator in duplicating services at SMSU.

A couple of years ago, he figured it was time to get back into what he majored in. So Bruns started making mixed media pieces, collages. He said he uses all kinds of materials - transparency paper, old book covers, pictures from magazines.

"Anything that is interesting, I can put together and make a piece of art of it," Bruns said. "There's something about old paper, old books they've got a quality and character to it that makes it interesting. They've been used a lotthere's a certain beauty that comes out."

And it's been kind of fun to get back into art, Bruns said. He has a studio in the basement of his home.

"God said to use our gifts," Bruns said. He is also a member of the Grace Life Gospel band that plays at area nursing homes and other events. "I didn't want to bury it, but to use it to glorify him (God)."

Bruns thinks it's neat how God is the ultimate creator and how the first verse in the Bible is how God created everything working with different colors, shapes and colors.

"It's creation for us to enjoy and to reveal who he is to us," he said.

Bruns said the hardest thing about creating abstract art is knowing when it's finished or if it's overdone. He lets the work develop itself.

"I tend (to be) more toward spontaneous, just let it happen," Bruns said.

 
 

 

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