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A ‘relatable’ play

Photo by Cindy Votruba Damon Brown as Theseus, Ariel Smith as Hermia and Aaron Dunn as Egeus, rehearse a scene from Marshall High School’s production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

May 3, 2013
By Cindy Votruba , Marshall Independent

MARSHALL - Even today's teens can find relevance in the words of a play that was written more than 400 years ago, said actors in the upcoming spring show at Marshall High School.

MHS is performing William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at 7:30 p.m. today and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday in the Schwan Community Center for the Performing Arts. The show is being directed by Dan Smith.

Memorizing the lines in Shakespeare's comedy isn't too difficult, said Emma Meyer, who portrays Titania/Hippolyta.

Article Photos

Photo by Cindy Votruba
Damon Brown as Theseus, Ariel Smith as Hermia and Aaron Dunn as Egeus, rehearse a scene from Marshall High School’s production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

"There's such poetry to it, and I enjoy the sound of it so much that I don't mind it being harder (to do)," Meyer said.

Jeff Paskach, who plays Nick Bottom, said he had a Shakespeare class last year, and "A Midsummer Night's Dream" was a show he always wanted to do.

Stage manager Thomas McCoy said the actors have been doing a good job of getting things done, even with a couple of missed rehearsals because of snowy weather.

"They're doing really well," McCoy said. "They really make it easy to follow and understand. It's not your typical Shakespeare experience."

"The cast works really well together, I think we draw a lot of inspiration from what each other is doing," Meyer said.

Paskach said he's gotten into his role; one he truly enjoys doing.

"What I love about Bottom is he's clearly not the most intelligent character, but at the same time, he's very passionate," Paskach said.

The actors said audiences will really love "Midsummer."

"It's relatable, the crazy things people do when they're in love," Meyer said.

"Mr. Smith always says there's a reason Shakespeare is still played today, it's so easy to connect to," McCoy said.

Some people can be hesitant about seeing a Shakespeare show if they haven't had much exposure to it, Paskach said.

"But once they see it, they will have a blast," he said.

 
 

 

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