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Food a symbol of tradition in Tyler

July 29, 2013
By Samantha Downing , Marshall Independent

TYLER - The Danish traditions were alive and well at Aebleskiver Days in Tyler this past weekend.

Along with folk dancing and traditional meals, there were, of course, Tyler's favorite treat: aebleskivers.

Aebleskivers are a traditional Danish dessert, snack or breakfast that the people of Tyler and those visiting have come to love and cherish.

Article Photos

Photo by Samantha Downing

Diane Sorenson of Tyler and Lexie Sorenson of Eagan helped make aebleskivers Saturday. For more photos go to cu.marshallindependent.com

Originally, the aebleskivers were made using wheat flour, buttermilk, eggs, sugar and salt, but modern conveniences have made the actual batter much easier to make. Nearly every Danish community uses a different recipe depending on where they are from in Denmark.

Apples, applesauce or raspberry, strawberry, lingonberry or blackberry jam can be added to the top and then the pancake balls are sprinkled with powdered sugar.

The pan is what really makes the aebleskiver special. It is a circular cast-iron pan with seven spheres indented in it. The batter is poured in and then turned with a knitting needle, skewer or fork.

"We put the pancake batter into the pan and have to turn them to give them their spherical shape," Diane Sorenson of Tyler said.

She was one of many busy making the aebleskivers on Saturday afternoon. Her granddaughters came all the way from Eagan to help her.

"I'm only Danish by marriage, but his family has made me a Dane," Sorenson said.

Aebleskivers were sold for a low price, and it seemed as if everyone had one in their hand at one point or another.

Saturday afternoon there was even an aebleskiver eating contest with a prize of $25 for the winner. And on Saturday evening there was an opportunity for yet more Danish food.

"There was rolleposte, liver poste, salmon and roast pork that you could put on open faced sandwiches. There was also red cabbage," Julie Kent of Tyler said.

"My favorite was the Danish coffee cake. It was really good," Emily Snyder of Tyler said.

The food was all served at the Danebod campus on Saturday evening before the parade. During the day, there was folk dancing and an opportunity to learn more about Danish traditions.

 
 

 

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